Executive Order on America’s Supply Chains

On February 24, 2021, the White House released Executive Order on America’s Supply Chains


The most interesting take-away is that DHS, not the DoD, is tasked with reporting on the Information and Communications Technology (ICT) industrial base, including the industrial base for the development of ICT software, data, and associated services. There is no mention of CMMC.



In summary, the assistant to the President for National Security Affairs (APNSA) and the Assistant to the President for Economic Policy (APEP) shall coordinate the executive branch actions necessary to implement two time-sensitive requirements within this executive order:


1. Within 100 days of the date of the executive order, these agencies shall submit a report to the President and policy recommendations to address those risks, through the APNSA and the APEP:

  • The Secretary of Commerce shall submit a report identifying risks in the semiconductor manufacturing and advanced packaging supply chains.

  • The Secretary of Energy shall submit a report identifying risks in the supply chain for high-capacity batteries, including electric-vehicle batteries.

  • The Secretary of Defense (as the National Defense Stockpile Manager) shall submit a report identifying risks in the supply chain for critical minerals and other identified strategic materials, including rare earth elements (as determined by the Secretary of Defense).

  • The Secretary of Health and Human Services shall submit a report identifying risks in the supply chain for pharmaceuticals and active pharmaceutical ingredients. The report shall complement the ongoing work to secure the supply chains of critical items needed to combat the COVID-19 pandemic, including personal protective equipment.

2. Within 1 year of the date of the executive order:

  • The Secretary of Defense shall submit a report on supply chains for the Defense Industrial Base (DIB) that updates the report provided pursuant to Executive Order 13806 of July 21, 2017 (Assessing and Strengthening the Manufacturing and Defense Industrial Base and Supply Chain Resiliency of the United States), and builds on the Annual Industrial Capabilities Report mandated by the Congress pursuant to section 2504 of title 10, United States Code. The report shall identify areas where civilian supply chains are dependent upon competitor nations, as determined by the Secretary of Defense.

  • The Secretary of Health and Human Services shall submit a report on supply chains for the public health and biological preparedness industrial base.

  • The Secretary of Commerce and the Secretary of Homeland Security shall submit a report on supply chains for critical sectors and subsectors of the information and communications technology (ICT) industrial base (as determined by the Secretary of Commerce and the Secretary of Homeland Security), including the industrial base for the development of ICT software, data, and associated services.

  • The Secretary of Energy shall submit a report on supply chains for the energy sector industrial bas.

  • The Secretary of Transportation shall submit a report on supply chains for the transportation industrial base.

  • The Secretary of Agriculture shall submit a report on supply chains for the production of agricultural commodities and food products.

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